Category: Quick Facts

Considering Buying A Home? Why You Should Consider A Reverse Mortgage

Reverse Mortgages, once typically thought to only help struggling seniors, have undergone enormous changes recently and are being used to help even affluent retirees achieve their retirement dreams and home buyers purchase new homes.

The Reverse Mortgage for Purchase program is quickly gaining in popularity. This program allows seniors to purchase a home using a reverse mortgage and live mortgage payment free. To qualify for this program, borrower(s) simply need to be age 62 or older, be purchasing a home to become their primary residence, and have their “required investment”. There are no income or credit requirements and just like with any other type of home loan, the borrower will still be the homeowner and will always retain the title. In addition, similar to a homeowner who owns their home free and clear, there will not be a monthly mortgage payment but the borrower will still be required to pay property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, HOA fees, and basic upkeep and utility payments.

The borrower can use this loan to purchase single family homes, town homes, and FHA approved condos. Unfortunately, these loans cannot be used to purchase homes under construction and the home must have a “Certificate of Occupancy” issued prior to starting the application process.

As mentioned above, the borrower will need to have their “required investment” or down payment. This amount is determined by a calculation set by HUD based on: the lesser of the sale price or appraised value, the age of the youngest of the borrowers, and the current expected interest rate. There are many examples available of these numbers to help real estate professionals and borrowers determine the price bracket they should search based on the required investment they have available.

Unlike a traditional mortgage where the loan reaches a “maturity date”, reverse mortgages have a “maturity event”. This is the event which causes the loan to become due and payable. These “events” include: the last remaining borrower passes away, the homeowner sells the home, the last remaining borrower leaves the home for 12 consecutive months, or the homeowner defaults on property taxes or insurance.

Prior to being approved for a reverse mortgage, HUD’s Federal Housing Administration (FHA) requires each borrow to participate in a counseling session with an approved agency. These not-for-profit agencies are funded by the federal government and work closely with both the FHA and lenders to ensure a smooth process. The goal of this session is not to steer a potential borrower in one direction or another, but to make sure they clearly understand all aspects of a reverse mortgage.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Boulder, Longmont, Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, and Front Range areas of Colorado.  Click here to contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you. 

 

Getting A Reverse Mortgage As A Married Couple

reverse mortgage colorado loveland fort collins longmont greeleyIf you and your spouse are considering obtaining a reverse mortgage, it’s important to understand the long term effect it could have on either spouse once the other passes away, and feel confident any appropriate protections are in place.

What Married Couples Need to Know 

When applying for a reverse mortgage the amount of money you can receive is calculated according to the age of the youngest borrower.  The older the borrower, the more money is available from the lender.

If both homeowners are over the age of 62, both homeowners can be on a reverse mortgage loan.  If both spouses are on the loan, the loan continues if either passes away and will continue until both borrowers have passed.

Another scenario to consider is if a borrower obtains a reverse mortgage and then remarries.  If this was to happen, it wouldn’t be unheard of for the married couple to live in the home for 20 or more years before the borrower passes.  At this time the new spouse would not be protected under the existing reverse mortgage loan.  If you have reverse mortgage and you remarry, you could consider looking into refinancing the reverse mortgage and adding the new spouse to the loan.

And yet one more thing to note is the possibility one spouse needs to move out of the home into an assisted living facility due to health concerns.  If this happens, as long as the spouse that remains in the home is on the loan, they can continue under their current reverse mortgage.

Bottom line: If you are married and are considering obtaining a reverse mortgage, it is extremely important to work with a trusted and experienced reverse mortgage specialist who can easily answer all of your questions and address any concerns you may have.  Making sure both spouses are protected should be a lender’s top priority.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado, as well as the Cheyenne and Laramie communities of Wyoming.  Contact Jan to learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Watching Out For Identity Theft

According to the 1998 Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act identity theft is when someone “knowingly transfers or uses, without lawful authority, a means of identification of another person with the intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any unlawful activity that constitutes a violation of federal law, or that constitutes a felony under any applicable state or local law.”

The three most common types of identity theft are:

  • Financial identity theft (using another’s identity to obtain credit, goods and services)
  • Identity cloning (using another’s information to assume his or her identity in daily life)
  • Medical identity theft (using another’s identity to obtain medical care or drugs)

How does Identity Theft happen?

In today’s technology driven society, protecting your identity is more important than ever.  But don’t assume identity theft only happens online.  It can happen anywhere, anytime.  Someone could be watching over your shoulder as you fill out a form at your doctor’s office.  Another individual could be rummaging through your trash, hoping to find a tossed out credit card offer.  Your email program’s spam filter may not be blocking those emails from Phishing websites.  There are many ways to fall victim to identity theft, arming yourself with facts and prevention is key to protection.

How do I protect myself from Identity Theft?

  • Be aware of your surroundings.  When filling out forms that include private information, take a seat away from others when possible. Never throw out forms or paperwork that may have your personal information on them, always take these home with you and dispose of them properly.
  • Don’t toss out credit card offers or other junk mail that pertains to obtaining credit.  In addition, any other private information you have – bills, car registration, insurance documents, bank statements – should always be disposed of properly and NEVER put out with your household trash.  These items should be shredded or burned.  In addition, limiting the amount of junk mail you receive by “opting out” of mail distribution lists can vastly decrease your risk.  Opt out by calling 1-888-5-OPTOUT.
  • Never follow links to bank accounts, credit accounts, PayPal accounts, etc from an email.  “Phishing” emails may appear as a completely legitimate email from your bank or credit card company, warning you of unauthorized transactions or other alarming information.  These emails will include links that take you to a website that looks identical to your bank’s – but it’s not.  Once you enter your information into this “Phishing” site, you have given some of your most valuable financial information to a con-artist.  ALWAYS access your bank and credit accounts by entering their web address into your web browser, NEVER through a link.  Reputable companies will not contact you via email about such important matters.
  • Don’t respond to emails offering money in exchange for “helping” an individual transfer money into the country.  These are always scams and have proven to be very dangerous.
  • Password protect your computer and your wireless internet. Use firewalls and virus protection software.
  • Never give personal information to telephone solicitors or door to door solicitors.  Do not give out personal information over the phone unless you placed the call yourself.
  • Lock your car.  Identity theft via “glove compartment” information is on the rise.  Keeping your car locked can ensure you are not an easy target.
  • Don’t carry your Social Security card in your wallet or purse.  Purge expired credit cards, insurance cards, and ID’s regularly.  Keep these items at home in a safe place.
  • If you do not have a locking mailbox, do not mail payments using your mailbox.  Always take the mail directly to the post office.

What do I do if think I’ve been targeted?

Contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-IDTHEFT or www.ftc.gov

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, and Front Range areas of Colorado.  Click here to contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Reverse Mortgage vs HELOC vs Downsizing

reverse mortgage loveland fort collins greeley longmont westminster coloradoHome equity accounts for approximately 70% of a senior’s assets, not including social security or pension.  Often times tapping into this equity becomes inevitable when facing health crisis or financial restrictions in retirement.  Using home equity should be part of a larger financial plan and there are a few ways it can be incorporated.

Reverse Mortgage

reverse mortgage is available to seniors 62 and older with married couples being eligible to both be on the loan if both meet the age requirement.  Homeowners who obtain these loans do not make monthly mortgage or loan payments but  instead receive the funds in a variety of available options, including monthly installment and a line of credit.   The loan does not have to be repaid until the last borrower passes away, at which time there are options available to heirs.  The amount of the loan depends on the amount of equity in the home and the age of the borrowers – the older the borrower, the more money they can receive.  This is an excellent option for both seniors with questionable retirement funds or the retiree who is looking to boost their portfolio.

Home Equity Loan

home equity loan (HELOC) also taps into equity by borrowing money against the home.  This type of loan will be processed as a conventional loan and monthly payments will need to be made to the lender.  Any health or future financial concerns should be thoroughly thought through prior to taking out a home equity loan.  Loading up the home with debt during retirement can be risky and could result in loss of the home if the borrowers are unable to make their monthly payments.

Downsize

Another option would be to downsize all together by selling the existing home and moving into a more modest situation.  Depending on the amount of equity in the home, a homeowner may be able to sell the home for enough money to comfortably be able to make rent or mortgage payments for 10 to 20  years.  Just as with a home equity loan, this option could be risky for a person with health concerns as the funds set aside for housing could be needed elsewhere.  For homeowners looking to downsize, a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase is also a very good option.  This will allow the borrower to move into the home they desire AND eliminate mortgage payments.

Before making any major decisions regarding how to effectively use the equity in your home, it is best to consult with a financial adviser and a reputable reverse mortgage lender.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado, as well as the Cheyenne and Laramie communities of Wyoming.  Contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Would You Have These Things In Order If Your Spouse Passed Away?

reverse mortgage loveland fort collins greeley longmont westminster coloradoRegardless of age, losing a spouse is difficult – and the impending “business” that comes along with it doesn’t make it any easier.  This is why we should all ask ourselves at some point, “Am I prepared if my spouse dies?”.  There are so many various aspects to being “prepared”, and although I can’t help with many of them, I can help with some simple suggestions to making sure you aren’t stuck with unexpected questions.

It’s not uncommon in marriages or partnered relationships for each spouse to take care of different bookkeeping tasks.  For example, it’s very common for the husband to manage retirements funds – pensions, IRA’s, etc.  While the wife may handle personal address books or paying bills.  Take a minute and think about this?  Not only what  you may not know, but what your spouse may not know.

Here are some suggestions to putting this information in order:

• Begin by making a list over a week or two, and ideally an entire month.  Make note of what “business” you do.  How many passwords did you need online?  How many account numbers on the phone?  What about PINs?  The results may surprise you.  In today’s high tech yet overly scammed world, everything is secured under lock and key.

•  Although it is best if both spouses can contribute to this exercise it is not a requirement.  Either way, spend some time brainstorming together.  We often will remember things when discussing them with someone else.

• It’s important to make a physical list of this information, whether typed or handwritten.  What you shouldn’t do though is save this information online.  Hackers will seek data that includes account numbers, logins, and passwords and this could lead to compromising your accounts and even identity theft.  Even if you think it’s secure, there really is little guarantee that is true.  Keeping this list with your most important documents – such as birth certificates, titles to homes and vehicles, etc – is going to be your safest bet, but make sure both spouses know where to find it.

What to include on your list:

Name and phone number of company, account numbers and any PINs associated.  If using online management of account, include website URLs of where to login, login name and password, and any auto pay information.  If there are specific people you work with at these companies, include their names.

If only one spouse is listed on the account, make an effort to add the other one.  I recently witnessed an elderly woman at the DMV who was unable to renew her driver’s license because all the mail that came to the home was in her husband’s name.  This is more common than many people realize – and often they don’t even know until they’re caught in jam.

• Home loan
• Home insurance
• Car loan
• Car insurance policies
• Health insurance policies
• Life insurance policies
• Bank accounts
• Credit card accounts
• Pension, IRA, annuities, etc
• Utilities – electric, water, gas, phone, trash
• Facebook, LinkedIn, etc
• Contact information for family and friends
• Contact information of bankers, retirement or financial planners, loan officers
• Contact information for doctors, dentists, pharmacies, veterinarians, etc (and a little info about what each one is for)

These lists will vary from person to person, so make sure to add your own ideas.  Also be sure to update it when anything changes or is added – because hopefully you won’t need it for quite a few more years!

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado, as well as the Cheyenne and Laramie communities of Wyoming.  Contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

5 Reverse Mortgage Myths That Need To Go Away

Reverse mortgages have made a serious comeback in the past several years.  After regulation changes were enacted in 2015, the reverse mortgage loan once considered a desperate lifeline is now being used as a retirement tool for even the wealthy.  The loans are still only available to seniors 62 and older (including married couples) with the amount of funds available increasing depending on age and appraised value of the home, but now those funds are often being accessed in ways not available before – such as a line of credit or to purchase a home.  This really is not your mother’s reverse mortgage, it’s something much more versatile than it was years ago.

Here are some lesser known facts about today’s reverse mortgage:

1.)  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – the borrower will always remain the homeowner as long as basic responsibilities such as property taxes are paid, homeowners insurance is kept current, and utilities and HOA fees are paid.  One of reverse mortgage’s scariest myths has always been that a bank will own the home.  This couldn’t be further from the truth.  Not only will the borrower remain the homeowner, they will also retain the title.

2.) There are NO mortgage or loan payments.  That’s correct.  Regardless of how the borrower decides to utilize the reverse mortgage funds, they will not pay a loan or mortgage payment while they remain in the home.

3.) With a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase, borrowers can wrap both the home purchase and the reverse mortgage into the same transaction allowing them to buy their dream home – AND the reverse mortgage will substantially supplement purchasing power allowing a home to be purchased that may have once been out of their price range.  When using a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase, the borrower is required to provide some down payment and the reverse mortgage funds will make up the rest of the purchase price.

4.) Married couples can both be on the loan regardless of how the funds are utilized.  Another all too common myth is that in the case of a married couple, if one spouse passes away the other spouse will be evicted.  When working with a reputable reverse mortgage lender this should never happen.  As long as both spouses are 62 or over, they can both be on the loan allowing either borrower to stay in the home until the last spouses passes away or permanently leaves the home.

5.) Heirs are not “saddled” with the debt of a reverse mortgage.  After the borrower(s) pass away, there are several options as to what the heirs can do with the home.  And in today’s hot housing market, the home may gain equity that can be available to the heirs.  Most all reverse mortgages are FHA insured meaning the loan will never exceed the amount of the home sale – even if more is owed, and it also means it will only ever require the amount of the loan even if the home is worth much more when it comes due.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Erie, Dacono, Fort Lupton, Windsor, Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado.  Contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Should You Be Considering A Reverse Mortgage To Buy A Home?

reverse mortgage loveland fort collins greeley longmont westminster coloradoWe’re all familiar with the two most common options to purchase a home – take out a mortgage loan or pay cash.  But for seniors 62 and over, there’s another option – the Reverse Mortgage for Purchase program (aka HECM for Purchase).

Looking for a home in Fort Collins, Loveland or Longmont, Colorado but finding it’s a bit out of your price range?  Because the borrower is responsible for only the down payment on the home and will have NO mortgage payments, a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase can help with this too.

What is needed to qualify for a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase loan?

  • you must be age 62 or older (each borrower on title must meet this criteria, although others residing in home do not)
  • the home you are purchasing must be your new primary residence
  • must meet the FHA’s new reverse mortgage credit and income guidelines
  • you must have your “required investment” (down payment) from a HUD allowable source. The funds cannot be borrowed. The required investment can come from the sale of a currently owned home or asset, a gift or inheritance, or money you have had for at least 90 days.

Who owns the home that I am purchasing?

 As the borrower and homeowner, you will always retain the title to the home, just like any other type of home loan.

What will my personal ongoing obligations be after purchasing a home?

It’s very similar to if you owned your home free and clear – you will NOT have a monthly mortgage payment.  But as the homeowner, you will be responsible for paying property taxes, home owner’s insurance, HOA fees when applicable, and basic upkeep including home maintenance and utility payments.

When will the loan become due and payable?

With a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase the loan does not reach “maturity” until:

  • the last remaining borrower passes away
  • the homeowner sells the home
  • the last remaining borrower leaves the home for 12 consecutive months due to illness
  • the homeowner defaults on property taxes or insurance

Will I need to sell my current home residence to qualify?

Simply put, no. As long as the loan on your current residence is not an FHA loan and your required investment comes from a HUD allowable source, you can keep your current residence – but the new home will need to be your primary residence. Your lender will ensure you are financially stable enough to support the ongoing obligations on all properties you own. If you decide to keep your current residence as an investment, rental, or vacation property – or you are awaiting the sale of home, it is rarely a problem.

What types of properties can I purchase?

Single family homes, town homes, and FHA approved condos are all eligible properties. The home being purchased will need to be the buyer’s primary residence.

Can I use the loan to build a new home?

Previously these loans could not be used as construction loans and homes needed a Certificate of Occupancy before the loan application could be started.  This changed in 2017, and now homes in construction are eligible.  Read here to learn specifically about obtaining a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase on new construction. 

How is the “Required Investment” amount determined?

The “required investment” or down payment is determined by a calculation set by HUD based on:

  • The lesser of the sale price or appraised value
  • The age of the youngest of the borrowers
  • The current expected interest rate

What may disqualify me from a Reverse Mortgage for Purchase loan?

  • Foreclosures within the past 3 years.
  • Unresolved bankruptcy
  • Unpaid Federal obligations – i.e. federal taxes, defaults on prior government backed loans (such as student loans or government backed mortgages)
  • Income too low to support multiple properties
  • Unpaid judgments or tax liens

What is the HUD required “Reverse Mortgage Counseling”?

Prior to being approved for a reverse mortgage, HUD’s Federal Housing Administration (FHA) requires each borrow to participate in a counseling session with an approved agency. These third party, not-for-profit agencies are funded by the federal government and work closely with both the FHA and lenders to ensure a smooth process.  The goal of this session is not to steer a potential borrower in one direction or another, but to make sure they clearly understand all aspects of a reverse mortgage.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Erie, Dacono, Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado, as well as the Cheyenne and Laramie communities of Wyoming.  Contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Breaking Down The Costs Of A Reverse Mortgage In Colorado

reverse mortgage loveland fort collins greeley longmont westminster coloradoOver the years reverse mortgages have shifted from being a choice of last resort to a creative and effective retirement planning tool. But still many who do not fully understand how reverse mortgages function will immediately bring up the perceived high cost of originating the loan. 

When all costs and variable options are considered, the opposite is true. Reverse mortgages actually cost considerably less when used as a source of income when compared to a portfolio or continuing to make payments from a portfolio after the age of 62. They also allow for financial freedom during some of the most important and valuable times in life.

Let’s start by looking at the actual costs. People are generally familiar with the costs that come with a traditional forward mortgage.  They do vary by state but consist of lender fees, third party fees like appraisals and title costs, origination fees, PMI and other miscellaneous costs. 

All of those are similar to a reverse mortgage with the exception of one difference: Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP). This is a 2% fee based on the home value which goes to the FHA to insure the loan.

So, what does that insurance fee get you?  Why is it required? 

In the case of a traditional forward mortgage, insurance encourages the lender to lend to a borrower with a lower credit score or a small down payment so they are insured by the mortgage insurance company if there is a default.  Reverse MIP is much more powerful than forward PMI.  It not only insures the lender, but also the borrower AND the borrower’s heirs.  The reverse mortgage is a non-recourse loan that requires no payments until the borrower passes away or moves out of the home permanently.  That’s a solid guarantee.

As we’ve seen the past few years here in Colorado, home values continue to rise.  And just as we’ve seen before, that’s not guaranteed to continue forever. No one really knows what the home value will be next year or a decade from now. With this MIP, the borrower can live a very long life, and even if the home value plummets, if the balance on the loan is more than the value of the house, the MIP fund pays out the loss to the lender. The borrower, or the borrowers’ heirs, will never be responsible for any negative gap between loan balance and home value or any tax liability. 

Additionally, it’s very common that there is equity left over to pass on to the children because the home value has increased faster than the loan balance. In this case, even with the FHA insured loan, the heirs will always receive any equity in the home. 

Now how do you calculate these additional costs into a financial portfolio? Let’s look at some ways a reverse mortgage can be used.

The first factor is often also the biggest benefit – eliminating a mortgage payment so that cash flow is freed up to invest or use for other purposes.  Currently 44% of seniors reaching the age of 62 are still making a mortgage payment.  Most can afford it, but it needs to be asked if this is the best use for the money.

The second factor to consider is for those who are wealthy and have what one would consider “plenty of money” with homes that are already paid off. These people still have a cost of living, and often it is high.  The funds to maintain their lifestyles has to come from somewhere, whether passive or active income.  A reverse mortgage just acts as another source of income, and it is often the most efficient and cheapest income available to someone past 62.  Advisors can keep their senior clients fully invested in longer term portfolios while maintaining a cash reserve in the reverse mortgage line of credit. And that line of credit is guaranteed never to be cancelled or closed as long as the borrower meets their basic responsibilities such as paying homeowners insurance, taxes, and other basic fees such as HOA. It also requires no payments and is guaranteed to increase every year that goes by even if the house value does not.

And the third factor is quality of life.  As these individuals plan for the rest of their lives in a way only retirees do, the answer isn’t always calculated in dollars and cents, it’s calculated in time spent vacationing with grandchildren and creating memories with friends and spouses. This particular return on investment should never be overlooked.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Lupton, Erie,  Lafayette, Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado. Click here to contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

Tips To Using A Reverse Mortgage To Delay Social Security

reverse mortgage colorado fort collins loveland greeley longmont cheyenneWhen planning for retirement, there will no doubt be a discussion about when a retiree should start taking their Social Security benefits.

There are perks to delaying, for example Social Security benefits stand to increase as much as 7-8% per year if you don’t apply until age 70.  But many seniors need this income.  With the ability to apply for a reverse mortgage at the age of 62, and current low interest rates, retirees stand to actually make gains by using a reverse mortgage to supplement while delaying benefits.

When approved for a reverse mortgage, the borrower can choose from a variety of ways to access the funds.  It could be a monthly installment, a lump sum, or even a line of credit that in itself stands to grow over time.

This is a creative way to use the hard earned equity in your home to your benefit.  A well educated financial advisor would easily be able to help you decide if this is a good option.  Reverse mortgages are available to seniors 62 and over, including married couples, with an approved type of home.  The borrower will always retain the title to the home and reverse mortgages are insured by the FHA.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Lupton, Erie,  Lafayette, Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado. Click here to contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.

7 Top Reverse Mortgage Myths In Colorado

reverse mortgage loveland fort collins greeley longmont westminster coloradoReverse Mortgage was created to give our retiring generation a way to keep their homes and manage the ever increasing costs of life in America after working long and hard over the years. It is an option that could be just right for you. All applicants are required to participate in HUD approved counseling to ensure all their questions and concerns are addressed. Working with a reputable reverse mortgage specialist will also be critical in the process, as this person should be your advocate – even telling you when a reverse mortgage may be wrong for you.

In the meantime, unravel the myths floating around about what a reverse mortgage is and what it does.

Here are a few myth busting facts:

Myth #1: Reverse mortgages are only for poor people.
Fact: Many retirees use reverse mortgage as a way to fulfill their desires for retirement, or to help grandchildren with college, or even to move into their dream home.

Myth #2: It’s free money.
Fact: It is a loan specialized for those 62 years old and older that does not need to be paid back until the last borrower passes away or leaves the home permanently.  If anyone attempts to market a reverse mortgage as “free money”, beware as it is likely a scam.

Myth #3: You lose your home.
Fact: The title of your home stays in your hands.

Myth #4: It is not a safe program.
Fact: Reverse mortgages are FHA insured and fully guaranteed – regardless of how you receive the payout.

Myth #5: My equity is safe if I don’t use a reverse mortgage right now.
Fact: Your equity is dependent upon the housing market, which is always changing.

Myth #6: I must be a homeowner or use my current home to obtain a reverse mortgage.
Fact: Reverse mortgages can be used to purchase a home, even if you have never owned a home before.

Myth #7:  If I’m married, my spouse will lose the home if I pass away.
Fact:  Married couples can both be on the loan if both are 62 or older.  There are many ways to ensure both spouses are not at risk.

Jan Jordan is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist serving the Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder and other Front Range areas of Colorado.  Click here to contact Jan and learn if reverse mortgage is right for you.